Eureka!

For my family and friends, it comes as no surprise that one of my sources of creative inspiration is Walt Disney. More specifically, the animation and otherwise artistry of the Studio and Parks is, in my opinion, some of the best work ever done, anywhere in the world. Glowing review right? I don’t work for […]

Credit Where Due

I had an epiphany today. I was working on a job at work and started doing corrections to make the result polished when I noticed that some of the details were rather ugly ok a logo. The designer had clearly used Image Trace in Illustrator. It wasn’t the worst I’ve ever seen, but I did a better job in less than 10 minutes. I think that extra 5-8 minutes I spent on it are the difference between good and great. 10 minutes is the equivalent of $0.16 under my own pay scale. The business is not losing money by taking the time to do the job right. Even if no one would have noticed the curves and bobbles of the Image Trace, you don’t want to give the the opportunity to either.

I guess all of the above depends on the complexity of the work to be done. Maybe I’d use Image Trace for a photo or complex logo and only fix the bare minimum if it was going to take, say, an hour, or $10, of my time. I have had to use Image Trace for a photo simply because the original wasn’t big enough for me to use. Usually, however, I make it look like it’s a bit pixelated anyway so it looks like a raster, what most people expect from a digital photo. 

I try to avoid Image Trace on the whole unless I’m looking to clean up or stylize something. For example, I have a drawing in pen or pencil. I want the lines to be black and crisp and the whites to be transparent. Image Trace is perfect for that! You can set it so that you only have black and white and then play with the threshold and minimum area size in order to clean up some lines or make sure some fainter ones are traced properly. It’s a good idea to expand an Image Trace before editing it. Expanding the result allows for editing individual points. I’ve also used the Path > Simplify option to further clean up needlessly complex results. It’s an art in itself. 

Take it easy and remember to smile. 

Holding Two Jobs

Anyone who has had to work two jobs knows it’s unpleasant unless it’s 2 strictly part time jobs. I, of course, don’t fall into that category. I don’t even get paid time off since I’m an independent contractor and self-employed. There’s a real freedom to that. 

There’s also the problem that I don’t make nearly as much as I used to in a corporate job. I’m not complaining here. It is what it is. Having to be full time is a time-sink that doesn’t, yet, pay enough for the long run. I think that will get better soon. I also think I need to stop crashing at the end of the day and do design work! I feel awful about it. No more! Starting next week I take it seriously. I start treating my own freelancing as a second job that needs part-time dedication, at least 10 hours per week. 

This is it! Do or die! There is no try, only do! Where’s that from? Anyway, I’m still determined to get myself established in the freelancing world. I’ve been submitting proposals, at least one every couple of days. I can show that I’m actively trying. What I need to do is still look up a contest or two in the meantime to work on. That gets me practice even if I never win. 

Red. Yellow. Green. GO!

Take it easy and remember to smile. 

Looking Forward

As of this post, I’ve been working for 3 days, one of them completely in my own. It was really nice! So far, there’s nothing I’m totally in the dark about. I’ve worked with printers and an iron before. I’ve done iron-on transfers on a small scale. The one at the store is a giant 18 inch press instead of a small apparel iron like most people have at home. It’s actually easier to use since it’s hotter and does all the pressing for me! The embroidery machine is not very complicated since I’ve used a sewing machine once or twice, but I’ve yet to have a job to do on it to test myself. 

I learned the store does not do its own embroidery design. When they receive an embroidery purchase, they send out custom designs to be converted into an embroidery file. I may look into learning that to add to the store repertoire. I imagine I could do it for a lot cheaper. It may not be a long-term goal for the store, but it can’t hurt. Besides, it will add to my skills as a designer so I can make better decisions about how my designs work in various mediums. I can now ask clients questions such as “do you intend to use the design as embroidery?” It’s one of those skills I would t think I’d ever need to learn, but having it is a huge plus. If I do leave at the end of a year, I could always offer for the store’s owner to have me on file for their embroidery needs. 

I wonder if that’s something I want to do long term anyway. I have much interest in crafting and needlearts. I used to do cross stitch and hand embroidery as a kid, I still do crochet, and I recently taught myself to knit. Who knows. Maybe I will find out I didn’t know what I wanted to do all along. I have wanted to be a crafter for years. But it doesn’t pay to make hats all day. Embroidery files and making iron-on patches would be a big seller. Making something on a machine is always better than by hand in terms of making a business profitable. I’ve often thought about purchasing a knitting machine to sell knit clothing, but that’s a discussing for another post. 

Take it easy and remember to smile.

First Day Jitters

It’s no surprise that nerves are part of the first day at any new job. Mine started with needing to use the toilet only to find out there was a problem. The pipes leaked black stinky water on top of my smelly deposits. Perfect. Just what I wanted on the first day at a new job. At least it can’t get worse! I’m asking to use the toilet at the company next door. I told them I’d be back. 

So far so good. It’s a lot to do. I’m not alone right now so that’s the really good news. I’m sure that will be me in a year. The processes are common sense for the most part. They comply with what I already know about printing. The embroidery machine is new to me but also is similar to a normal sewing machine. I’m not as completely in the dark as I could have been.  Yay!

Take it easy and remember to smile.